Everything about Methylprednisolone

 

  1.What is Methylprednisolone
  2.Methylprednisolone powder usage
  3.Methylprednisolone powder Dosage
  4.Methylprednisolone side effects
  5.Methylprednisolone may interact with other medications

 


 

Methylprednisolone powder video

 

 


 

I.Methylprednisolone powder basic Characters:

 

Name: Methylprednisolone powder
CAS: 83-43-2
Molecular Formula: C22H30O5
Molecular Weight: 374.47
Melt Point: 244-246°C
Storage Temp: Room temperature
Color: White powder

 


 

1.What is Methylprednisolone?aasraw

 

Methylprednisolone, sold under the brand names Depo-Medrol and Solu-Medrol among others, is a corticosteroid medication used to suppress the immune system and decrease inflammation. Conditions in which it is used include skin diseases, rheumatic disorders, allergies, asthma, croup, COPD, certain cancers, multiple sclerosis, and as add-on therapy for tuberculosis. It is given by mouth or by injection into a vein or muscle.

Methylprednisolone(83-43-2) is a corticosteroid medicine that prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Methylprednisolone is used to treat many different inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, ulcerative colitis, allergic disorders, gland (endocrine) disorders, and conditions that affect the skin, eyes, lungs, stomach, nervous system, or blood cells.

Name:    Methylprednisolone powder
CAS:    83-43-2
Molecular Formula:    C22H30O5
Molecular Weight:    374.47
Melt Point:    244-246°C
Storage Temp:    Room temperature
Color:    White powder


 

2.Methylprednisolone usage?aasraw

 

Like most adrenocortical steroids, methylprednisolone is typically used for its anti-inflammatory effects. However, glucocorticoids have a wide range of effects, including changes to metabolism and immune responses. The list of medical conditions for which methylprednisolone is prescribed is rather long, and is similar to other corticosteroids such as prednisolone. Common uses include arthritis therapy and short-term treatment of bronchial inflammation or acute bronchitis due to various respiratory diseases. It is used both in the treatment of acute periods and long-term management of autoimmune diseases, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus. It is also used as a treatment for multiple sclerosis.

This drug is used to treat many conditions. It helps to control inflammation and to modify your body’s immune response. The conditions it’s used to treat include:

  • endocrine disorders such as primary or secondary adrenocortical insufficiency
  • rheumatic disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis
  • collagen diseases such as lupus or systemic dermatomyositis
  • skin diseases such as psoriasis or Stevens-Johnson syndrome
  • severe allergies that haven’t been controlled with other treatment, such as seasonal or year-round allergies or allergic reactions to medications
  • eye problems such as swelling or ulcers (sores) in your eye
  • stomach or intestinal problems such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease
  • respiratory problems such lung damage caused by beryllium poisoning, or Loeffler’s syndrome that’s not controlled by other treatments
  • blood disorders such as low levels of platelets in adults, or lack of red blood cells in children
  • neoplastic diseases such as blood cancer or cancer in the lymphatic system in adults
  • multiple sclerosis flare-ups
  • infections, such as trichinosis with brain or heart problems

 


 

3.Methylprednisolone powder Dosageaasraw

 

Dosage for endocrine disorders

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for rheumatic disorders

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for collagen diseases

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for skin diseases

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for allergies

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.

Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)
Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)
The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for eye problems

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for gastrointestinal diseases

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for respiratory diseases

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for blood disorders

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for neoplastic disease

Generic: methylprednisolone

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for multiple sclerosis

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 160 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: After taking 160 mg per day for 1 week, your doctor will reduce your dosage to 64 mg taken every other day for one month.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

Dosage for infection

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Typical starting dosage: 4–48 mg per day taken in one or two doses.
Dosage changes: If you respond well to the drug, your doctor may decrease your dosage slowly until you reach the lowest possible effective dosage.
Alternate day therapy: If you’re going to be on this drug for a long time, your doctor may have you take it every other day. This may reduce side effects.
Child dosage (ages 0–17 years)

Your child’s doctor will decide your child’s dosage based on the condition being treated. They should give your child the lowest effective dosage.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for a longer time. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

 

 


 

4.Methylprednisolone side effectsaasraw

 

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to methylprednisolone: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion), swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • bruising, thinning skin, or any wound that will not heal;
  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;
  • severe depression, changes in personality, unusual thoughts or behavior;
  • new or unusual pain in an arm or leg or in your back;
  • bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • seizure (convulsions); or
  • low potassium – leg cramps, constipation, irregular heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling.

Steroids can affect growth in children. Tell your doctor if your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medicine.

Common methylprednisolone side effects may include:

  • fluid retention (swelling in your hands or ankles);
  • dizziness, spinning sensation;
  • changes in your menstrual periods;
  • headache;
  • mild muscle pain or weakness; or
  • stomach discomfort, bloating.

 


 

5.Methylprednisolone may interact with other medicationsaasraw

 

Methylprednisolone oral tablet can interact with other medications, vitamins, or herbs you may be taking. An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works. This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well.

To help avoid interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, vitamins, or herbs you’re taking. To find out how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Drugs you should not use with methylprednisolone
Do not take these drugs with methylprednisolone. When used with methylprednisolone, these drugs can cause dangerous effects in the body. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Live vaccines, such as the nasal flu vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, and measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine: Don’t receive a live vaccine while taking this drug. A live vaccine is a weakened version of a disease. The vaccine won’t fully protect you from disease while you’re taking methylprednisolone.

Interactions that increase the risk of side effects from methylprednisolone
Taking methylprednisolone with certain medications raises your risk of side effects from methylprednisolone. This is because the amount of methylprednisolone in your body is increased. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Cyclosporine: These drugs can each cause the other one to break down more. You may have more side effects from methylprednisolone if there is more breakdown of cyclosporine than of methylprednisolone. You may have more side effects from cyclosporine if methylprednisolone breaks down faster than cyclosporine.
  • Troleandomycin and ketoconazole: Your doctor may adjust your dosage of methylprednisolone if you take either of these drugs. They may do this to keep your body from producing too much steroids.

Interactions that increase the risk of side effects from other drugs
Taking methylprednisolone with certain medications raises your risk of side effects from these drugs. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Aspirin: Your chance of side effects from aspirin increases when you stop taking methylprednisolone. If you have a blood clotting problem, ask your doctor if methylprednisolone is safe for you.
  • Warfarin and heparin: When used with methylprednisolone, these drugs can make your blood too thin and cause dangerous bleeding. Or they might not work as well to thin your blood. Your doctor should monitor you closely if you take either of these drugs with methylprednisolone.

Interactions that can make your drugs less effective
When methylprednisolone is used with certain drugs, it may not work as well to treat your condition. This is because the amount of methylprednisolone in your body may be decreased. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Phenobarbital, phenytoin, and rifampin: Your doctor may increase your dosage of methylprednisolone if you take any of these drugs.

 


 

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