In this article, we mainly introduce the natural plant extract goods, such as Bromelain, bitter orange, etc.

Bromelain is an enzyme found in pineapple juice and in the pineapple stem. People use it for medicine.

Bromelain is used for reducing swelling (inflammation), especially of the nose and sinuses, after surgery or injury. It is also used for hay fever, treating a bowel condition that includes swelling and ulcers (ulcerative colitis), removing dead and damaged tissue after a burn (debridement), preventing the collection of water in the lung (pulmonary edema), relaxing muscles, stimulating muscle contractions, slowing clotting, improving the absorption of antibiotics, preventing cancer, shortening labor, and helping the body get rid of fat.

It is also used for preventing muscle soreness after intense exercise. This use has been studied, and the evidence suggests bromelain doesn’t work for this.

Some people use a product (Phlogenzym) for arthritis (osteoarthritis) that combines bromelain with trypsin (a protein) and rutin (a substance found in buckwheat). Bromelain used in this way seems to reduce pain and improve knee function in people with arthritis.

There isn’t enough scientific evidence to determine whether or not bromelain is effective for any of its other uses.

How does it work?

Bromelain seems to cause the body to produce substances that fight pain and swelling (inflammation).

Bromelain also contains chemicals that interfere with the growth of tumor cells and slow blood clotting.

Pineapple, a South American native and a cherished part of Hawaiian folk medicine, is one of the richest sources in the world of the enzyme bromelain. It is composed of several endopeptidases and compounds like phosphatase, glucosidase, peroxidase, cellulase, escharase and protease inhibitors.  Usually “bromelain” sold in extract or supplement form refers to enzymes extracted from pineapple stems or cores, rather than from the fruit’s flesh.

Used widely as a natural remedy to treat everything from indigestion to allergies, pineapple is not only brimming with this enzyme, but also vitamin C, vitamin B1, potassium, manganese and phytonutrients. While pineapple has many benefits, the real secret to its healing powers is definitely bromelain.

What is bromelain used to treat? In the medical world, this fascinating compound has traditionally been used as a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-swelling agent. Research have also shown that it has fibrinolytic, antiedematous and antithrombotic properties, meaning it helps prevent blood clots, edema and swelling. In the past, this enzyme was also used as a meat tenderizer, reason being it helps to soothe and relax tense, inflamed muscles and connective tissue. Additionally, recent studies have found evidence that this enzyme stops lung metastasis in its tracks, which suggests that bromelain can be used to treat a wide variety of diseases, potentially including cancer.

A look at the scientific literature, which includes 1,600-plus articles evaluating the medicinal benefits of bromelain, shows that it has been used to treat a wide range of health problems, including:

Connective tissue injuries, such as ACL tears

Sprained ankles

Tendonitis

Allergies

Arthritis, joint pain and osteoarthritis

Digestive issues like heartburn or diarrhea

Cardiovascular disorders

Asthma

Autoimmune diseases

Cancer

Inflammatory bowel disease

Sinus infections, such as bronchitis and sinusitis

Surgical trauma and slow healing of skin wounds or burns

Poor absorption of drugs, especially antibiotics, and symptoms due to taking medications

Bitter orange, Seville orange, sour orange, bigarade orange, or marmalade orange refers to a citrus tree (Citrus × aurantium) and its fruit. It is native to southeast Asia, and has been spread by humans to many parts of the world. Wild trees are found near small streams in generally secluded and wooded parts of Florida and The Bahamas after it was introduced to the area from Spain, where it had been introduced and cultivated heavily beginning in the 10th century by the Moors. Bitter orange is marketed as a dietary supplement because of its stimulant properties, although safety data are lacking and it and has been linked to a range of harmful side effects including strokes and heart attacks.

Many varieties of bitter orange are used for their essential oil, and are found in perfume, used as a flavoring or as a solvent. The Seville orange variety is used in the production of marmalade.

Bitter orange is also employed in herbal medicine as a stimulant and appetite suppressant, due to its active ingredient, synephrine. Bitter orange supplements have been linked to a number of serious side effects and deaths, and consumer groups advocate that people avoid using the fruit medically. It is still not concluded if bitter orange affects medical conditions of heart and cardiovascular organs, by itself or in formulae with other substances. Standard reference materials are released concerning the properties in bitter orange by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), for ground fruit, extract and solid oral dosage form, along with those packaged together into one item.

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